Helping Frustrated Renters Become HAPPY Homeowners

I’ve been hiking quite a bit over the last fifteen years, or so. What really ramped it up at that time was a decision to climb Mt. Baker. (I made it, and have done it again since.)

Whenever I have a big goal to aim for, I seem to do that. I guess that’s not surprising. We tend to step up our game when there is a prize to be claimed.

But that’s a topic for another day.

Currently I’ve really ramped it up again, as I’m training for my serious trek later this month, at high elevation, to Machu Picchu.

And here’s what I’ve noticed: more and more people seem to be hiking. Fifteen years ago, I could hardly find the barely visible path that led up to McKee Peak. I had to note the tiny evergreen just to know where to branch off from the base trail. Now that tree is 15 meters tall, and has already been trimmed down several times because it’s under the power lines. And no one would miss the trail because it’s heavily worn and heavily used.

A couple of years ago I discovered the Abby Grind near the gun club, a decent but not heavily used trail. Now, it’s a busy highway on a sunny weekend, with barely room for all the cars in the parking area at its foot. People are looking for alternatives because it’s always so packed.

Saturday, I hiked the more substantial Elk Mountain near Chilliwack, one that has a good grade for training purposes but also an incredible view. I’ve done it perhaps fifty times over the past ten years. On the way down this time, we passed probably a hundred people (and many dogs) coming uphill. At the foot, the parking lot was full and vehicles were parked for a long stretch along the Chilliwack bench forest service road.

Has hiking become that much more popular? If so, that would be a good thing, probably reflecting a greater priority among people to stay in shape. I think, too, the appreciation of the outdoors, the experience of nature and the imbibing of the fresh air are good reasons to take up such activities.

But, here’s the other thing that impresses me: the number of kids and teens I now see on these hikes. I say, “kudos to them; there is reason to be optimistic about the next generation.”

aturday, I hiked the more substantial Elk Mountain near Chilliwack, one that has a good grade for training purposes but also an incredible view. I’ve done it perhaps fifty times over the past ten years. On the way down this time, we passed probably a hundred people (and many dogs) coming uphill. At the foot, the parking lot was full and vehicles were parked for a long stretch along the Chilliwack bench forest service road.

Has hiking become that much more popular? If so, that would be a good thing, probably reflecting a greater priority among people to stay in shape. I think, too, the appreciation of the outdoors, the experience of nature and the imbibing of the fresh air are good reasons to take up such activities.

But, here’s the other thing that impresses me: the number of kids and teens I now see on these hikes. I say, “kudos to them; there is reason to be optimistic about the next generation.”

OK, so why do I make this connection? Why do I link up hiking with hope for the future?

Here’s why. Because keeping fit is the most essential ingredient for success in business and in life. When I listen to success coaches, they almost universally identify physical fitness as the first ingredient for productivity. My mentors and heroes are pit-bulls themselves when it comes to staying healthy and fit, with morning routines that include a gym workout, or some other physical activity.

While I don’t always emulate them, I don’t disagree with them. Whether it’s just a workout or a more pleasurable activity (like hiking), it’s worth staying fit. It will give me a healthier, longer and more productive life.

And a legacy for the next generation to take and run with (or should I say “hike with”?)

At least that’s how I see it . . .

Rent 2 Own tip

The hot Fraser Valley market has a lot of people saying, “I want to get into home ownership now before it becomes unaffordable.” And so we are getting good quality applications.

Others are being forced to look at alternatives as their landlords decide to sell the property out from under them while the market is hot. They’re forced to move on relatively short notice, and they’re tired of that song and dance. “We’ve had to move four times in the last two years, each time because our landlord sold, or developed the property,” one couple told me recently. “We’re tired of moving all the time.”

Bottom line: it’s harder, in this market, to find a good property that is also a good investment. But the faster we get on it, the sooner we’ll be able to get something for our clients who enroll in the program.

If you’ve been wavering on whether to check out rent 2 own, be aware that, if you wait too long, the market might pass you by.

Quote of the Week:

Every day is a grand adventure into the great unknown and you cannot know what lies around the next corner.

So, standing in this place, with the unknown before you, you have only two choices:

you can live in trust . . . or you can live in fear. . . .

Your choice will not change what’s around that next corner, but it will have a big impact on the way you feel today.

― Kimberly Giles